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  • 2004-2 ISSUES

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  • ISSUE 2/2004

                                                                                                                                                      2-2004 

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  • Trade promotion organizations will debate their role in maximizing their country's or region's competitive advantage through innovation, at their biannual meeting (Malta, 1-2 October 2004).

    World trade has risen rapidly over the past two decades. It grew by 4.7% in 2003 and is estimated to reach 7% this year, according to UNCTAD. That growth has extended to many developing countries.

    The coffee market is over-supplied. With the price of coffee at its lowest in a century, there will be winners and losers in the fierce competition for exports. Getting producers to "add value" to coffee and earn more revenue is a commonly proposed solution. However, this proposal is complex and, for many producers, unrealistic.

    For small firms to meet the significant and growing challenges of globalization, they need governmental and institutional back-up. A three-pronged approach can help build and strengthen competitiveness: closer business-government partnership; effective networking of national agencies involved in the value chain; and optimal use of new technologies.

    Globalization is changing business. Falling trade barriers, lower transport costs and communication technologies blur the lines between "domestic" and "international" markets. Whether businesses compete in foreign markets or compete locally with foreign firms, most of today's firms face sharper competition and are obliged to think more internationally than they have in the past.

    © International Trade Centre, International Trade Forum - Issue 2/2004 On the occasion of ITC's 40th anniversary, we'll issue a special collection of stories to show how ITC and its partners put trade to work for development. If you are from a developing or transition country and have export success stories, "

    On the occasion of ITC's 40th anniversary, we'll issue a special collection of stories to show how ITC and its partners put trade to work for development. If you are from a developing or transition country and have export success stories, "best practices" or lessons learned illustrating how trade contributes to development, we want to hear from you.

    Since 2002, ITC has achieved 20% year-on-year growth in delivery, and it plans to keep up the momentum in 2004. Innovation in content and delivery, focus on synergies and greater involvement of national partners are helping make growth sustainable.

    The results of ITC's work with women in trade are challenging perceptions of the role of women exporters in economic and social development - and the need to support them.

    In 2004, Trade Forum magazine celebrates 40 years of trade development news

    In a joint effort to protect artists and artisans in developing countries from theft of their creative ideas, ITC and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) have published a guide full of practical advice.

    © International Trade Centre, International Trade Forum - Issue 2/2004 ITC produces a variety of international trade bulletins which complement ITC's books and technical papers. To subscribe, contact the relevant sections of ITC listed below. Market News Service. Price and market information for seven

    ITC set a course for double-digit growth during discussions with donors and beneficiaries at its annual meeting, the Joint Advisory Group on the International Trade Centre (26-30 April).

    A niche in the marketSmall firms in the pharmaceutical sector are often well placed to satisfy demand for generic drugs, an area not always of interest to large suppliers of research-based products. However, for small firms to stand their ground they have to be efficient. They need to adopt the same competitiveness strategy as the large companies: economies of scale. As these aren't often found at the national level, firms need to look regionally for strategic alliances. ITC is helping small pharmaceutical firms and those in related sectors to find partners, through programmes such as LatinPharma.

    During its annual meeting, ITC launched its 40th anniversary celebrations. Many congratulated ITC on its achievements and encouraged it to continue along the path it has set itself.

    The global trading system is redefining business. Being competitive in today's interconnected economy means working within the rules of the trading system, as well as responding to more demanding markets. To meet the challenge, small firms in developing countries need efficient, innovative business practices and a proactive trade support infrastructure.

    For producers in poor countries, tapping into international business can bring access to wider and wealthier markets.

    Business Guide to Trade Remedies in the European Community: Anti-dumping, anti-subsidy and safeguards legislation, practices and procedures

    African countries stand to gain from completing the current round of WTO negotiations. ITC is helping developing countries re-engage in world trade talks through a series of regional workshops that bring business and government together to assess their gains and sharpen negotiating strategies.